Incatena


You may remember my prediction that by 2100 corporations would be run as democracies rather than monarchies, an idea I also put into the Incatena.  This was partly based on conviction and observation, as well as the experience of a few collectively owned and/or run companies.

But there’s a new poster child for democratic governance of corporation– Valve, as explained and put in context here by its resident economist, Yanis Varoufakis.

Some companies famously allow employees to put a fraction of their time– 10% or 20%– into projects of their own choice.  At Valve, that percentage is 100%.  All employees choose which projects to work on.  And Valve is famously successful.

The immediate advantages are obvious: you’re not stuck in a job or project you hate, so motivation and retention are high. Plus dumb ideas, even if they come from the CEO, are likely to be suppressed.

Now, Valve makes creative stuff, so intuitively this model fits their business.  Still, it’s worth pointing out that most creative-stuff companies, from EA to book publishers to Hollywood, are as hierarchical as any tsardom.  If anything, creative types are more capricious and unresponsive than (say) manufacturers.  Physical things usually come with their own metrics, but who’s going to tell George Lucas that he’s doing storytelling wrong?

The obvious objection is that if your company performs a service, like banking or insurance or flying planes, there’s a lot of scutwork and it wouldn’t get done with the Valve model.  (This is my pet theory, in fact, on why Episode 3 and/or Half-Life 3 hasn’t come out.)  But this isn’t so much of a showstopper as a problem to be solved.  If it even exists: we won’t know if the model fails for banking till someone actually runs a bank this way.

As Varoufakis puts it, the genius of the market is that incentives take care of this problem society-wide.  If not enough people are making veeblefetzers, then there’s an incentive for entrepreneurs to get into that market.  In the Valve model the incentive internally is really employee interest, and fortunately people are interested in different things.  If that alone isn’t enough, there’s always more traditional incentives, like raising pay in the scutwork department.  Or maybe it turns out that you outsource the scutwork to a company that specializes in it (and which itself could be run democratically).

Why haven’t more companies tried this approach?  It can’t be because it doesn’t work or scale, because it hasn’t been tried enough for us to know that.  So I think it’s inertia.  People are just too used to the tycoon, despite a couple hundred years’ experience showing that most tycoons aren’t that smart after all.  (There were brilliant kings, too, but that doesn’t make monarchy a real success.)

Advertisements

Quick question about the Northern Cities Vowel Shift and future Englishes— it seems to me an awfully regional shift to be incorporated broadly into subsequent daughter languages or dialects of English. When I look back at other sound changes in English, like the Great Vowel Shift, their success seems to be predicated partly on the more regionally restricted nature of English before British colonialism really took off— not to mention the fact that nowadays English seems to have more than one prestige dialect (American English might be argued to enjoy a little more prestige that British English globally, but American English is hardly monolithic).

I could easily see in a civilization like the Incatena, where you have a new central focus of political and cultural influence being established (Mars) whose standard language is not necessarily the mother tongue of many people who speak it (cf. the number of people in India or Africa who speak English as a second language), various dialects contributing to the formation of a new standard. Obviously some will have outsize influence, based on population and cultural influence, but it doesn’t seem to follow that a regional shift like the Northern Cities Vowel Shift would come to dominate.

Just curious if you followed a different line of reasoning on this.

—James.

It’s pretty simple, really: designing a future English, rather than simply make up the first step, it makes more sense to use a sound change that’s actually in progress, though it’s currently below public perception. 

For the “regional” objection, two points.  First, what’s the alternative, given that I want to use a real sound change?  I don’t think there’s any sound change of similar phonetic importance that is more geographically widespread.

Second, if anything is going to affect near-future American English, the Northeast US is probably about the best place for it to start.  It’s already the core of General American, and other US dialects (New England, New York, the South) have historically been stigmatized and not spread outside their regions. 

A better objection might be that it’s highly urban, and doesn’t seem to have spread to the suburbs and thence to the media.  But Labov says that typically sound changes spread from the working class upward and downward, so again this is just what we’d expect for the origins of a major change.  It’s true that not all changes keep spreading; but this is sf, not physics.  I wouldn’t bet a lot on the NCVS not spreading; but I wouldn’t be surprised if it stopped, either.

Now, I said Stennud was “50C Earth English”, but this is taking a broad interstellar view.  To be more precise, I’m going to say that UK and American English will no longer be mutually intelligible, and Stennud is the descendant of the latter.  It’s likely to be more of a world standard simply because North America is a much much larger clot of English speakers.

This could change if India actually switched to English.  I don’t think this is likely, and it’s even less so in the Incatena timeline.  Currently there’s something like 86 million Indians who speak English as a first or second language; compare that to 520 million for Hindi.  In the Incatena future, Dravidian India splits off (which removes a significant barrier to the further spread of Hindi), and the Collapse reduces American influence worldwide. 

Recall that interstellar travel is expensive and time-consuming; the vast majority of people never leave their home system.  Thus planets tend to diverge linguistically; there is no “Incatenese”.  Interstellar travelers tend to use either Hanying, the major language of Mars, or Sihorian Franca.  Stennud is not that big a deal off Earth.

I’ve been reading William Labov’s book on social factors in sound change, and I’m finally getting to the good bit: where he starts explaining who are the leaders in change.

But more on that later.  For now, I realized that future Englishes should really incorporate the completed Northern Cities Sound Shift.  In particular, the “Stannud” of the Incatena should be Stennud or even Stiynnud.

Kindle users are cheap, or something; the e-book has not been dancing off the e-shelves.  So I lowered the e-price to $3.99.  That’s so low that’s it’s barely a price at all!

Also I reformatted the book without hyphenation (which was screwing up the Kindle version), and redoing the Dzebyet samples (which were showing up as black boxes).  So if you got the earlier version and that bugged you, get the update.

By the way, if you’re British, here’s the Kindle page for Against Peace and Freedom.  Just £4.98.  I’m afraid the text is the same as the American edition, but I think you’ll find the attitude is more British than American.

And heck, für die Deutschenvolk mit der Englischsprachenung, it’s  €5,98.  Si vous êtes français je sais pas ce que vous pouvez faire.

   I thought getting the Kindle version of Against Peace and Freedom would take some time, but it turned out to be easy.

So you can buy it now!  It’s $6.99.

More, much more, about the book here.

I don’t have a Kindle, so I don’t know how closely the preview app correctly shows how the book will look on one.  The preview correctly displayed the Unicode characters.  If you buy a copy and they are not in fact readable, tell me.

Against Peace and Freedom is almost here, so I’ve created a page on the book, plus a page explaining why the Incatena is the way it is.

(I haven’t pressed the button yet, and I will probably order another proof.  But I’m hoping it’ll be ready by the end of July.)

« Previous PageNext Page »