I just finished Dishonored 2: Death of the Outsider, which I’ve been looking forward since seeing its fucken badass trailer. It’s the song that makes it.

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This is a really lovely steampunk dystopia

Now, I really liked Dishonored 2, so playing DOTO (terrible acronym) was relaxing with an old friend. We’re back in Karnaca, exploring the hell out of a small section of the city, either choking or croaking guards.

The main Dishonoreds suffer from the PC being too close to the top of the social hierarchy; the DLC for each is far more satisfying.  In D1’s DLC you played gruff assassin Daud, and in DOTO you play his assistant Billie Lurk– who also has a major role in D2. And you take on the biggest target of all: the dark god of this universe, the Outsider.

I’m impressed with how smooth the game is. The world is, by now, one of the most distinctive fantasy worlds in games. The level design is superb, and often beautiful.  I never needed a walkthrough– I missed a couple puzzles, but nothing that bothered me.  As ever, the game rewards exploring every nook of these little worlds, but they’re never so large that they feel like a chore. There are side quests (‘contracts’), but they’re designed so that you can take them on as part of the main mission.

This time, there’s no chaos system.  I read that the devs have explained this as meaning Billie is too insignificant a figure to change the way the empire works… which makes no sense, since how she treats the Outsider is a more cosmic choice than anything you do in D1 or D2.  A better explanation might be that the Outsider ran the reward system in the previous games– and you overrule his decisions here.  But on a gameplay level, it’s a good thing: it encourages you to play the game lethally or not, without worrying that you’re getting the “bad ending”.

I decided to play completely lethally.  It fits Billie, and it was a chance to play in a way I really hadn’t in any of the earlier games. It’s pretty fun!  For most of the game you rarely run into more than 4 or so enemies at once, which is doable.  It took me 14 hours, but I was still exploring everything, not trying to speed-run.  It would have taken quite a bit more in full stealth mode.

There are a few difficult enemies:

  • One level has those damn clockwork soldiers, which are really hard to take down. Fortunately there’s not too many of them.
  • One level has a load of cultists, and at first it seemed anything I tried would send all of them after me.  But finally I learned to provoke only a handful at a time.
  • The last level has a nasty rock creature, the “Envisioned”.  They seem way overpowered– I couldn’t kill any of them, and they can basically one-hit you. But it turns out you can avoid them.

Billie has a new set of powers, which frankly are nerfed compared to the earlier games.  But a full skill tree wouldn’t make much sense in a shorter game.  I missed the Blink ability, mostly because its replacement, Displace, is really bad at moving vertically. On the other hand, I liked Foresight, not least because it solves a problem with these detective-mode analogs: if you have detective mode, you pretty much want to stay in it all the time, which means you’re seeing the world with a dull filter on.  Foresight freezes time and lets you scout ahead briefly.  It gives you a very pleasing rhythm of clearing an area, using Foresight to scout ahead and mark enemies, and then moving in.

You can also steal someone’s face, which gives you some nice methods of getting past checkpoints and such.

At the end, you can either kill the Outsider– or not.  Storywise, I think they did a pretty good job making this an interesting choice. My own feeling is that the Abbey of the Everyman is far worse than he is, so I spared the dude.

The standout mission is a bank heist in the third chapter.  It’s not as spectacular as the Clockwork Mansion in D2, but as a game level, it’s far better planned.  Jindosh’s mansion is baffling on a first playthrough; the bank basically leads you through while making you feel like you’ve solved the puzzles yourself.

It felt like they had a far lower budget or something, and so re-used one map twice, and re-used another one from D2.  But this wasn’t really bad: in the first case, the second time you’re mostly in the bank, which is new; and in the case of the repeated Conservatory, it gives them a chance to show what happened after the events of D2, which very different people in charge.

My one complaint, perhaps, is that none of the enemies you meet are as vivid or memorable as Duke Abele or Jindosh or Delilah from D2.  The series works best with exaggerated, grotesque villains, and they didn’t really come up with one here.

(Well, one other minor complaint: on the Conservatory mission you can find a load of coins… and then you never get a chance to spend them.  I guess you could stop off at the Black Market on the way home. I kind of preferred D1’s system of letting you shop in the between-mission screens.)

I really hope, though, that this isn’t it for Dishonored.  I want to go blinking and assassinating in this strange nasty world again.

 

 

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