publishing


I’ve been revising the Book of Cuzei, and today I ordered a second proof copy. It usually takes less than a week to arrive; if it’s OK I’ll approve it for sale, and if not corrections will probably be minor and it’ll take a few more days.

Babblers-cover-front

One complication was that Microsoft Word turns out to be crappy at what should be its major competence: editing book-length printable manuscripts. This happened with The Conlanger’s Lexipedia too: if there’s enough complex formatting, then any additional editing, including adding a new paragraph, will crash the program. The only solution I’ve found is to divide the document in two. This is why the Lexipedia doesn’t have a comprehensive index. The Book of Cuzei does, but only because I hand-edited it. I can’t express how mega-stupid this is; this is what Word is for.

I also uploaded the files for the omnibus edition today. Unfortunately Amazon won’t let me sell it for the price point I wanted– it’s going to be $22.95 in print, though they’ll probably discount it. That’s still less than the $29 it’d cost to buy both books. I am ordering a proof copy of this too, of course, so I can see if the 650-page behemoth is actually usable. (If not I’ll probably have to reformat it for a larger page size, which will probably be delightful.)

The Kindle version will follow shortly. It’s not much use creating it until the print text is finalized. But doing so only takes a day or so.

There won’t be a Kindle omnibus; I was going to just charge $4 or so extra for it, and then realized that I might as well just charge $3.49 for the Kindle Book of Cuzei. That is, selling Book A for $X and Book B for $Y and Book A+B for $X+Y makes no real sense. Just buy both books.

Finally, a shout-out to Edwin Perales who drew the illustration for the cover shown above, and to Mornche Geddick who read the whole Book of Cuzei. There’s not many readers who can find typos in Cuêzi, but she’s one of them, and I wholeheartedly recommend her services in case you have some Cuêzi proofreading to do– undoubtedly a growth industry as there’s nowhere to go but up.

I approved the proof of In the Land of Babblers a few days ago, created the Kindle version, and, good lord, it’s available right now. The print book is on sale at $12.56.

Babblers-cover-front

If you’re not in the US, it may take some days for the appropriate Amazon local minions to serve it up.

The proof for The Book of Cuzei arrived too. That’s 382 pages of superior supplementalness. It will take me a bit to read through it, so it’ll probably be available at the end of the month or soon after. Then the omnibus edition is a matter of stitching the two books together. If you think you want both, it’s worth waiting for that.

I had about a week in between proofing the books, which I could have spent in any number of productive ways, but instead I got a massive cold. Still feel pretty rotten, in fact, but it’s getting better.

I ordered the proof copy of In the Land of Babblers today. So it’s on the way!

Babblers-cover-front

Once the book arrives, I’ll read the hell out of it. I always find more reading a physical copy than I do reading it in Word. Then I make corrections, and generally order another proof. So it should be ready sometime in September.

Plus there’s a companion volume– all sorts of material on Cuzei, published and not. That’s mostly done, but I may add something else to it, so it may take just a bit longer.

The Conlanger’s Lexipedia is now available at Amazon.

http://www.zompist.com/lexipedia.html

The paperback is out now; the Kindle will be available in a few days.

Perfect for conlangers, conworlders, language freaks, firefighters, actuaries, Methodists, snipers, spies, baritones, lepidopterists, Mind Flayers, and gnolls!

The proof copy of The Conlanger’s Lexipedia arrived last week, and I’ve been proofing and revising.  Then my wife started reading, which is adding time to the process, but it’s valuable.  She worked as a Spanish editor, so sometimes her instincts are wrong (e.g. on capitalization of titles); however, she pointed out a couple places where I demonstrated a somewhat deficient mastery of the alphabet.

The Lexipedia nestled in a pile of its sources. My floor looked like this most of the last year

The Lexipedia nestled in a pile of its sources. My floor looked like this most of the last year

(Huh.  My camera is not only poor at capturing indoor scenes, it lives in the past.)

This weekend I hope to get the final PDF files together, so hopefully the sales page will be up in about a week.  Behind schedule, but as alert reader John Cowan helpfully pointed out, not by nine years, like Johnson’s Dictionary.

So, where’s the book? I ordered the proof copy today. As soon as it comes, I’ll do some intensive editing and correcting, and then GET IT OUT THE DOOR.

Each step seems to be taking just a little longer than I expect. But the end is near. Tell all your loved ones to buy you a copy!

Finally got all my Lexipedia text in one file. I wrote most of the text in the 20-year-old Word 5.1, which is blindingly fast, but did the etymologies in New Word, which handles Unicode. Plus the etymologies were alphabetical, and they had to be divided up by section. Anyway, it’s all in one place now, and reformatted for 6×9, and I can finally see how many pages I have: 388. That’s longer than the PCK, and I haven’t done the diagrams yet.

As a break, and to balance all this book stuff, I decided to put up a new Almean story. It’s a bit of a trifle called “The Multipliers”.

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