change log


In case you don’t check the mothership anymore, I have a new page up, on the track record of liberalism vs. plutocracy. (Spoiler: the former works better.)

As part of the LCK2, I’ve updated the Sound Change Applier.  Like gen, it’s written in Javascript for portability.

A summary of the changes (for details see the help page):

  • Supports Unicode
  • Spaces are treated as word boundaries
  • Supports epenthesis (adding new phonemes)
  • Supports metathesis (reversing the target string)
  • Nonce categories (useful if they’re just for one rule)
  • Extended category substitution
  • Gemination and degemination
  • A gloss can be added that isn’t changed by the rules
  • Rules can be written in the form c→g/V_V
  • Rewrite rules allow you to use digraphs, or long category name

As usual, there’s a bug in IE, which I’m looking at now. Would you believe, in the year 2012, IE doesn’t support s[i] to get s.charAt(i).

After 16 years, the online Language Construction Kit was in need of an overhaul.  And here it is!

http://www.zompist.com/kit.html

It’s been Unicoded and generally prettified, I’ve greatly expanded the phonetics section, and corrected a number of errors or obscurities.  (In most cases this meant bringing in text from the print LCK, but not always.) 

There’s also two entirely new pages!  One is a guide on writing your grammar.  It covers outlining, how to create paradigms, how to write glosses, how to know when you’re done.

Plus, I’ve created a Javascript vocabulary creation program, gen. It runs in your browser, so I don’t have to make versions for multiple operating systems.  The neat thing about it is that it chooses possibilities according to a power law, rather than assigning all of them the same probability.  This is far more naturalistic.

In my ongoing quest to pay the rent, I’ve signed up for Google ads.  They will be blank for a few days.  I’ll see if they actually work before plastering them all over.  I’m sorry if they bug anyone, but you can always ignore them.  I also took the opportunity to redesign the main page, which I find I haven’t done for about six years.

More exciting for readers is the search box, which will search just zompist.com + Almeopedia + my blog, which is pretty neat.

I created a page on the nearest stars, so you can create your own Federation.

Updated the French comics page with some recs from Mathieu Richir, and the Latin American comics pages now that I finally read Keko and Mort Cinder.

Forgot to mention this: there’s a new grammar up, Lé.  It’s isolating, and also fun because it belongs to a female-dominant culture.

I’m finally done with a year-long rewrite of the Historical Atlas of Almea.

A sample

 All the maps have been redrawn (a little larger) and the text entirely revised and Unicoded.  In the ten years since the original web version, I’ve added a whole lot more information about Almea, so there is often more detail to add or refer to; there are also more languages done, so quite a few names have changed. 

Plus I revised the climate for the whole planet, and that required a bunch of changes on the base map: the northwest of the map is now steppe and savanna rather than savanna and jungle; there’s a desert south of the Barbarian Plain; and Gurdago had to be moved to the west side of Luduyn because climatically eastern Luduyn really wanted to be tundra.

I’ve been collecting nice quotes for years, and finally got a new page up.  The previous page was done in 2001… I’m very selective.

I’ve updated the proto-Eastern page to include the relevant information on Luxajia– sound changes and vocabulary.

There’s also a nice new languages map (actually it’s the one from the new atlas).

Luxajia is a Čia-Ša language; specially a Čia one.  It replaces “Lufaša” in earlier Almeology.  The Great Reclimatization hit Luduyn hard; Gurdago had to be moved to the opposite coast, and its history was pretty much entirely rewritten.  As Gurdago took over the Čia region but not the Ša region, the best-known language had to be from the Čia family.

In addition, I took the opportunity to work out ‘real’ Čia-Ša names.  Both halves of the double-barrelled name mean ‘people’; it’s cognate to PE *gens and thus to Verdurian ženLuxajia is named for Luxae, ‘bend (of the river) city’; the -e comes from Old Skourene .

My original intention was for the Čia-Ša languages to be monosyllabic; I didn’t do that, as I already have two monosyllabic languages over in Arcél.  Luxajia has a strong preference for roots to be no longer than two syllables, though.

This doesn’t mean I’m done with the Luxajia grammar… only with those words that derive from proto-Eastern.

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